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HomeTechnologyEVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE PENTAGON'S UFO REPORT

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE PENTAGON’S UFO REPORT

Highly anticipated report on Pentagon’s investigation on Unidentified Aerial Phenomena (UAP) the highly anticipated announcement of the Pentagon’s research into UAP, also known as UFOs and UFOs, was published today. It includes a few snippets of information from the Pentagon’s newest UAP task team, examining unidentified objects using the lens of national security. It is because the Defense Department said last year that it takes “any intruders from unauthorized aircraft into our ranges of training or designated airspaces extremely serious. …”

It is believed that the government’s UAP program and the UAP report have triggered a media frenzy that has pushed UFO conspiracy theories back into the mainstream. But, contrary to the media hype, the report doesn’t contain evidence of aliens. We know this about the information so far.

WHEN WILL THIS PENTAGON UFO REPORT COME OUT?

The Senate Intelligence Committee squeezed in a note in the massive COVID-19 relief bill, which demanded the Pentagon to provide both classified and unclassified copies of UAP reports. UAP report within 180 days, but not after Friday, June 25.

UAP? WHY NOT SAY UFO?

They’re almost identical. UAP is an acronym for unidentified aerial phenomena, a brand new term for unknown flying objects. The idea of naming a Pentagon program following UFOs would be a bit absurd for a large, extremely serious intelligence program.

In the end, including “objects,” the name may be too restrictive of description for a program that has to deal with the unknowable. Do we want to call them “objects” if we’re only experiencing strange forms through blurred camera footage taken from military aircraft? “Phenomena” would be slightly more accurate. It’s described by definition as “a fact or situation that is observed to exist or happen, especially one whose cause or explanation is in question.”

HOW DID THIS START?

The answer depends on the distance you’d like to travel back. U.S. has been involved in UFO research for many years, and various documents have been released throughout the years.

There was an Air Force that had Project Blue Book in the 1960s, and it ended in 1969 after a thorough investigation into over 12,500 sightings of UFOs. The CIA released a cache of UFO-related historical records on January 1, which revealed more government attempts to explain the mystery of unidentified aerial phenomena during the time after the end of Project Blue Book. The historical records do not connect any mysterious phenomena with extraterrestrial activities.

PENTAGON TAKES UAP “INCURSIONS… VERY SERIOUSLY”

The government has stated that it’s usually interested in UAPs or UFOs due to national security issues. In a report from August last year, The Defense Department said it takes “any incursions of unauthorized aircraft into our ranges of training or airspaces that are designated and will scrutinize each report carefully. This includes the examination of incursions initially classified as UAP in the event that the observer is unable to immediately discern what they are observing.”

The fascination of UFOs, in general, has been around since 1947, the year that an amateur pilot operating his plane close to Mount Rainier in Washington state was able to report seeing 9 “saucer-like” objects darting across the sky. His account of what he saw led to an avalanche of media interest.

BUT HOW DID THE MOST RECENT ROUND OF UFO… SORRY — UAP — DISCOURSE START?

It began in 2017 when reports published in The New York Times and Politico confirmed the existence of the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (AATIP), a secret Pentagon project launched in 2007 to look into mysterious phenomena. It ended in 2012. It was officially established under the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) and later transferred to the headquarters of the Defense Department. The program was reported to be operated by a former official in the military intelligence field Luis Elizondo, who has stated that he quit in 2017 because of the internal debate he felt was a hindrance to the government-funded UAP research.

(It’s important to note that both New York Times and the Politico reports were criticized for being skeptical of Elizondo’s assertions and too accepting of the possibility that UAPs could be linked to alien activities. However, the most recent Vox article does a decent job explaining some of the backgrounds and is worth a look.)

AATIP also collected studies about the most bizarre ideas straight from the pages from science fiction ranging from nuclear propulsion to invisibility cloaking the warp drive and metallic glass, programming matter, and more., according to an inventory of AATIP research products presented to Congress in the year 2019.

According to Times in the Times and the Politico reports, the AATIP’s initial “black” budget of $22 million — a small amount compared with other Pentagon budgets– was put forward by the former Nevada senator and space-related fan Harry Reid. The bulk of the money was given to a Las Vegas-based space-related company run by hotel magnate and UFO lover Robert Bigelow, a political donor to Reid and a longtime acquaintance of Reid. Bigelow revealed to The Times that Bigelow Aerospace, his business Bigelow Aerospace, modified the storage facilities at its headquarters to make room for the enigmatic “metal alloys” that were found during working on AATIP. While The Times did not attribute the alloys’ source to aliens, this claim has was criticized. There has been no information on the alloys that have been disclosed since. Bigelow hasn’t spoken publicly about the alloys after his appearance in the Times, and a Freedom of Information Act request submitted by the DIA at the beginning of 2018 hasn’t been answered, and there is no information provided (yet)

Although AATIP has been shut down, it is a possible successor. In June of 2020, it was announced that the Senate Intelligence Committee confirmed the existence of the Unidentified Aerial Phenomena Task Force, which is part of the Office of Naval Intelligence. It was the Pentagon has confirmed the presence of and declared that the UFO Task Force was established only a couple of months later, and outlined in a press release the organization’s purpose as “to detect, analyze and catalog UAPs that could potentially pose a threat to U.S. national security.” In December of this year, the intelligence committee granted the Pentagon an additional six-month period to prepare an assessment of the findings of the task force on UAPs. The report was published on June 25. A complete secret version of this report was presented in the House of Congress on June 2, according to an individual who was familiar with the information.

WHAT DOES THE REPORT INCLUDE?

It’s always been likely to believe that the Pentagon report will reveal the nature of the objects, and it’s not clear like U.S. intelligence officials are aware of these objects. So, according to the report, it’s as mysterious in the same way as it’s a national security risk.

The report could confirm the identity of one UAP from the 144 words. “In that case,” the report notes, “we identified the object as a massive balloon that was deflating. Other balloons are not explained.”

The task force focused on the reports of military aviators made between 2004 and 2021. The majority of them came out in the last two years, following the new reporting system. Eighteen incidents appeared to show strange flight patterns. Eleven reports from pilots documented “near misses” with a UAP.

According to this report, “Some UAP appeared to remain stationary even in high winds or move in opposition to the wind, make abrupt changes or at a high speed, with no apparent means for propulsion. In a few instances military aircraft systems processed the radio frequency (R.F.) energy that was associated in UAP observations.”

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